NEC Electronics Inc. and VideoLogic Thursday announced that PowerVR Second-Generation technology will be the visual heart of the Sega next-generation console, expected to be released in Japan in November 1998 and worldwide in 1999.

The PowerVR Second-Generation technology, implemented in the new Sega console — to be called Dreamcast in Japan — is expected to achieve more than 3 million polygons per second, offering a new level of visual reality in gaming.

With the endorsement of one of the world’s leading console makers, PowerVR Second-Generation technology moves one step closer to becoming the first 3-D graphics technology adopted across all three major gaming platforms: personal computer (PC), console and arcade.

Cross-platform adoption of PowerVR Second-Generation technology will allow software developers for the first time to create a single game for console, PC and arcade systems — potentially in simultaneous release to game players.

“Sega is setting new standards in gaming by bringing together an unprecedented alliance of worldwide leaders in electronic entertainment,” said Shigeki Matsue, president and CEO, NEC Electronics. “With Dreamcast, NEC is proud to be Sega’s partner in charting the course for the future of interactive entertainment.”

“We want to set a 3-D graphics standard for the gaming industry,” said Hossein Yassaie, vice president, research and development, VideoLogic.

“A cross-platform standard means a game console player, an arcade fan and a PC-enthusiast can experience the same visual quality in a game. That’s a powerful concept for gamers and game developers.”

The PowerVR graphics accelerator in Dreamcast is based on PowerVR Second-Generation core technology as PC and arcade chips to be announced later this year. The PowerVR Second-Generation technology was announced Feb. 23, 1998.